Sunday, February 3, 2008

Juice Analysis, Organic Produce, and Inspiration


I've been a little worried about my juicing habits lately because my urge to juice was dwindling. Even this morning (after two days without juice) I was questioning whether I could keep this up. After doing a full yoga practice, it was back. I went downstairs and juiced away! The picture to the left is what I started with.

I was curious about which nutrients I was benefiting from in this juice, so here the analysis I came up with, using The Complete Book of Juicing by Michael T. Murray. I listed the key benefits of each vegetable, fruit, and root.
Celery:
  • Potasium
  • Sodium (electrolyte replacer)
  • Coumarins (increases activity of certain white blood cells, tone vascular system, lower blood pressure)
Carrot:
  • Highest vegetable source of provitamin A carotenes
Cucumber:
  • Skin contains Silica (strengthens connective tissues, i.e. muscles, tendons, and ligaments)
Ginger:
  • Excellent Carminative (promotes elimination of intestinal gases)
  • Anti-inflammatory
Lemon:
  • Rich in Vitamin C and Potassium
  • Contains Limonine (promising anti-cancer properties)
Apple:
  • Pectin (improves the intestinal muscle's ability to push waste through the gastrointestinal tract)
  • Ellagic, chlorogenic, and caffeic acids (anutrients with significant anticancer properties)
And here is the result of those veggies and fruits plowing through my Breville juicer:

I am going crazy trying to figure out where to buy produce and which produce to buy. Until yesterday I thought that any produce bought at Whole Foods was organic. Not true! Anything marked "Conventional" is not organic. Bummer.

Also, I wonder about the integrity of companies like Nature's Promise. Nature's Promise is easy to find at the cheaper, chain grocery stores in Baltimore: Giant and Super Fresh, but how great are these fruits and vegetables really?

I am excited that Kris Carr has brought up the idea of a book club in her blog. I am interested in reading, Michael's Pollen's book, In the Defense of Food and it would be nice to share the experience with her community.

I am working on a fiction novel at the moment, but my interest in writing a creative non-fiction novel is increasing as I become more inspired by my pursuits in alternative health and wellness. Also, I feel inspired each day by information coming from blogs and books that I am drawn to make a contribution as well. Its like the idea is at the tip of my tongue, but it hasn't come to fruition yet. I am going to have faith that it will come in its own time and I just have to keep on this path. With that thought in mind, I should get back to other writing projects. Peace and love:)

1 comment:

Lindsey said...

Don't take my word for it! Talk to the people who work at Whole Foods, I'm sure that can give us the low down. And it does seem like they're the best option around for now. According to their website, "We carry natural and organic products because we believe that food in its purest state — unadulterated by artificial additives, sweeteners, colorings, and preservatives — is the best tasting and most nutritious food available.
Our business is to sell the highest quality foods we can find at the most competitive prices possible. We evaluate quality in terms of nutrition, freshness, appearance, and taste. Our search for quality is a never-ending process involving the careful judgment of buyers throughout the company.
*We carefully evaluate each and every product we sell.
*We feature foods that are free of artificial preservatives, colors, flavors, sweeteners, and hydrogenated fats.
*We are passionate about great tasting food and the pleasure of sharing it with others.
*We are committed to foods that are fresh, wholesome and safe to eat.
*We seek out and promote organically grown foods.
*We provide food and nutritional products that support health and well-being.
Whole Foods Market's Quality Standards team maintains an extensive list of unacceptable ingredients. However, creating a product with no unacceptable ingredients does not guarantee that Whole Foods Market will sell it. Our buyers are passionate about seeking out the freshest, most healthful, minimally processed products available."